an unknown land

full of strange flowers and subtle perfumes                                                      a collection of passions from a librarian seeking a library to call her own


Ask me anything  
Reblogged from capnromanoff
Reblogged from bluewindsummer

bluewindsummer:

priorities

(via thefrogman)

Reblogged from sunshinegames
Reblogged from tesahrey

(Source: tesahrey, via whoistorule)

Reblogged from popbonobuzzbaby
miss-love:

dontbaffletheboff:

miss-love:

fullten:

popbonobuzzbaby:

Eddie Izzard - shopping at Mac store in Soho
New York City - May 14, 2014

When I was a kid I saw his HBO special. I watched it so many times I still know most of the words.  It was the first time I saw a man dressed feminine, be funny, and not have women as a punch line. He didn’t slump out in front of the stage embarrassed by his clothing, he came out perfectly happy, hoping around, and didn’t do some silly feminine voice for laughs, he just used his voice, he wore his clothes, spoke about social injustice, and he was fucking funny. It was nice to watch a comedian and not be the fucking punch line or a flattened stereotype for laughs. 

Eddie Izzard has always been my favorite since I was young. I never thought about it, but his identity and way he dressed were never really part of the joke. Being feminine was not for laughs and he unabashedly was who he was and never apologized. I saw him perform live and he’s positively electric. He would walk on stage in full makeup and a sparkly dress and I think within five minutes of speaking he had a way of making every cis/heteronormative person stop seeing him as “atypical.” He always shut that down.
In recent years I haven’t seen him expressing himself as much, and I worried he was trying to conceal his love of dressing feminine in order to be more successful in the acting field, but I’m really glad to see he’s back to the bright lipstick and fierce nails.He really did make being feminine a powerful thing and not just a punchline and he showed me a lot about gender expression and identity at a young age when I had never seen anything like it.

"They’re aren’t women’s clothes. They’re my clothes. I bought them." - Eddie Izzard

^great quote

miss-love:

dontbaffletheboff:

miss-love:

fullten:

popbonobuzzbaby:

Eddie Izzard - shopping at Mac store in Soho

New York City - May 14, 2014

When I was a kid I saw his HBO special. I watched it so many times I still know most of the words.  It was the first time I saw a man dressed feminine, be funny, and not have women as a punch line. He didn’t slump out in front of the stage embarrassed by his clothing, he came out perfectly happy, hoping around, and didn’t do some silly feminine voice for laughs, he just used his voice, he wore his clothes, spoke about social injustice, and he was fucking funny. It was nice to watch a comedian and not be the fucking punch line or a flattened stereotype for laughs. 

Eddie Izzard has always been my favorite since I was young. I never thought about it, but his identity and way he dressed were never really part of the joke. Being feminine was not for laughs and he unabashedly was who he was and never apologized. I saw him perform live and he’s positively electric.
He would walk on stage in full makeup and a sparkly dress and I think within five minutes of speaking he had a way of making every cis/heteronormative person stop seeing him as “atypical.” He always shut that down.

In recent years I haven’t seen him expressing himself as much, and I worried he was trying to conceal his love of dressing feminine in order to be more successful in the acting field, but I’m really glad to see he’s back to the bright lipstick and fierce nails.
He really did make being feminine a powerful thing and not just a punchline and he showed me a lot about gender expression and identity at a young age when I had never seen anything like it.

"They’re aren’t women’s clothes. They’re my clothes. I bought them." - Eddie Izzard

^great quote

(via springsnotfail)

Reblogged from circuitbird

(Source: circuitbird, via fursasaida)

Reblogged from bruesselbach

wintersoldierfell:

limnrix:

bruesselbach:

Daughters of Mercury: a series of full length oil portraits of trans women by Janet Bruesselbach now has a video, edited by animator Kate Thomson because I haven’t touched a video editor in three years. Ambient tinkling is “Written in the Stars” by h34rken​! I also lowered the price of an original painting. The Kickstarter should go live Sunday, September 21, and there’s a launch party at The Library at 7 Ave A, NYC, that evening (get there before 6 for 2-for-1 drinks). 

Beep boop my dumb face reading

PLEASE signal boost this! Janet is an amazing painter, I’ve known her for years and watched her work go from good to incredible, and this is a project worthy of attention. Please just make people aware this is happening. These are amazing women who deserve the dignity, beauty, and intimacy of representational portrait painting.

Reblogged from until-i-find-you
Reblogged from koikoikoi

plunderpuss:

drovie:

koikoikoi:

Cool tattoos by Nomi Chi

thelostboys97

Those are phenomenal.

(via wintersoldierfell)

Reblogged from breakourbones